Category Archives: 8 harness weave

Autumn Rep Runner

imageThe completed Autumn inspired runner  is from the Rosalie Neilson weaving workshop I took last month.  The runner will be gracing my dining room table at Thanksgiving. Of course once all the food is placed on the table it maybe hard to see.  There will be the traditional turkey with all the extras, green bean casserole, candied sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes and gravy, asparagus, cranberry sauce, and yeast rolls, followed up by pumpkin pie. We’ll be hosting my daughter and her boy friend. My son and his fiancé will be at her families dinner.

The remaining two motifs woven were published in the previous post, “Designing with Rep Weave.”

Little oranges

The bounty from our little orange tree. The top of the tree suffers from freezing last winter. Yet it produced 10 oranges much better than last years crop of zero. May you all enjoy the bounty and fellowship of Thanksgiving.

Weaving inspired by Autumn

Fall False SatinIt’s that time of year again. The temperature cools. The garden stores are selling mums and the trees will begin turning colors. I have often chosen to weave fall colors into my woven pieces. Shades of burgundy, oranges, golds, browns and green yarns are selected. I work off of memories of Fall in Minnesota, since here in Texas most of the trees won’t change for several months.

The weaving above will be towels of cottolin (a cotton linen blend). They are woven as an 8 harness broken twill, also called false satin. A true satin weave requires more than 8 harnesses to weave and so I can not do on my loom.

Every time one of these towels is picked up I will think of going for walks amongst maple trees changing colors and leaves crunching under foot.

Another Bronson Lace

3 shuttle

3 shuttle

These Bronson Lace towels have been on the loom for quite a while. There’s 2 left to weave so I need to get motivated. I’ve woven this pattern before and find that it’s one I come back to weave in different colors. This is an 8 harness weave. The pattern looks different depending on the number of different colors you use in the weft and where the colors are placed in the pattern. Here are some examples:

2 shuttle

2 shuttle

The top photo uses burgundy, black and gray in weft. The photo above uses only burgundy and black in weft. The burgundy looks pinker when crossing the gray. Need to remember this color interaction in the future. The photo below shows another 3 shuttle towel but with more shuttle changes.

3 shuttle

3 shuttle

Weaving a whole towel like this, was a little insane with all the shuttle changes needed to create the pattern. So only one towel will be woven this way. The pattern does work well as a border only.

So I’ll close with a nature shot.

Muscovy ducks at BJ's

Muscovy ducks at BJ’s

These ducks were on the sidewalk outside the restaurant bumming for handouts. They had no fear of humans, not a good thing. A little late in the year for this batch of ducklings.

Tranquil Waters Dress

Tranquil Waters DressAlmost 2 years ago I wove and dyed 3 some yards of Handwoven Shibori fabric. The dyed fabric reminded me of the tranquil waters in the Bahamas. I wanted to make something to wear, but what? In my mind I envisioned a dress, but there wasn’t enough fabric. The Shibori fabric would need to be the focal point in the dress. So I wove another 3 yards of solid color fabric in a simple 8 harness twill, using a cotton/silk blend. The Shibori fabric is made from 8/2 Tencel.  These two fabrics were used to sew the dress using Simplicity 1586 pattern.  I  modeled the dress in the Contemporary Handweavers of Texas 2015 conference fashion show this past weekend. The back of the dress also has the center panel of handwoven Shibori fabric with side panels in the twill fabric. It only took 2 years but I accomplished my goal. The challenge now is to find a use for the remaining fabric.  What do you envision creating?


And They’re Hemmed

Twill white sqsThese are the finished towels from the post “Spring has Sprung”. I had fun playing with different combinations of ways to treadle.Twill White SqI created borders on each side of the towel. That way however it’s hung up there is a pretty border design.twill stripe sqsThis is the last design I wove. There would be many other combinations if I just hadn’t run out of warp. I wove 6 towels total.
Off to the Contemporary Handweavers of Texas conference tomorrow. Hoping for inspiration!

Playing with crimp weave

Crimp weave 10/2 & sewing

This sample of crimp weave was woven on warp left after weaving a scarf. It’s narrow since the original scarf was only 7 inches wide. The warp is a 10/2 Tencel and weft a polyester sewing thread. This gives a lovely hand. Note to self when setting up to weave future scarf warp width should be at least 15 inches in reed.

Floating squares towel
The towels which were on the loom are off and need to be hemmed. This was the warp I showed in a previous post “Spring Has Sprung“.  I’ll post the variety of designs I wove when the handwork is finished. My time lately has been spent sewing handwoven fabric into a garment for the upcoming Contemporary Handweavers of Texas conference in June. With a sigh of relief it will go to the post office tomorrow. There will be pictures to share after the conference. So what to put on the loom next?
We had a little too much rain a week ago. The lake flooded in the park where I walk. Later that day the water had receded and the grounds cleaned up. Other areas near continue to have flooding a week later. More rain is in the forecast here. With any luck it will come in light sprinkles. Today was a beautiful sunny day, letting us relax with a swim in the pool.

The Front Side


In the last Post I promised you a picture of the front side of the scarf once it came off the loom.  The scarf does not have  a nice drape. It is heavy  or stiff so it  will most likely be cut up to create smaller objects. Oh why didn’t I sample? I’m using  a 16/2 bamboo  instead of the 10/2 bamboo used in the first piece for the next scarf. The fabric is now lighter and should give a nicer drape. Yes there is a color difference. Above  a Teal yarn in tabby. Below the second scarf on the loom using  a navy  tabby yarn.

Tabby: Navy 16/2 Bamboo

Tabby: Navy 16/2 Bamboo


The plants are beginning to think Spring has arrived in Houston. Hopefully they will look this nice after the rain stops.


Treadle Envy

Bateman Blend CCW

When looking through sample books from Cross Country Weavers, I found myself having  treadle envy. I’m sure your asking yourself what could she possibly be talking about. My loom has 8 harnesses and 10 treadles.  The sample that I found myself interested in weaving needed 7 harnesses ( no problem) . Alas, it used 11 treadles.  A couple of years earlier I had designed a piece needing more treadles than I possessed.  Here  Tim’s Treadle Reducer program comes to the rescue.  You enter in the shafts, and treadles in the original design, and the number of shafts and treadles on your loom.

TreadlereducerClick on ” Make a grid” , to go to next step below: Entry

Treadle Reducer Entry                            Treadle Reducer results

In reducing the number of treadles needed to weave the design, treadling becomes more involved. At times you need to depress two treadles at the same time. A small price to pay to weave more complex designs.

This program has allowed me to begin weaving a scarf inspired by a sample by Sally Orgren in Cross Country Weavers, March 2008, using  a  Bateman Blend  pattern. The photo at the top, shows what will become the backside of my scarf. So follow the blog to see the finished scarf in a future post.

Crimp Weave workshop

Crimp bamboo poly sewing

Crimp weave sample

In January I attended Dianne Totten‘s Crimp  Weave Workshop put on by the Contemporary Handweaver’s of Houston  Guild.

My loom was setup to do weft Shibori which meant I needed to use a polyester or Orlon yarn in the weft to create crimp cloth. These two types of yarn are heat sensitive. The warp could be any fiber I wanted to use.  I used a teal 10/2 bamboo with a few stripes of silver 8/2 Tencel. The threading was an advancing twill.  As a workshop the point is to try to weave as many samples as possible. After the samples are woven and taken off the loom,the pattern threads are pulled tightly up. Next the piece is steamed, and pattern threads are removed. The result is crimp cloth, fabric with permanent texture.

Sample on loom.  Black threads are pattern pull threads.

Sample on loom.
Black threads are pattern pull threads.

Samples above were made during workshop. Different yarn types, sizes and combinations of yarns were used in weft to create the samples. The possibilities are endless.  Now what weave structure to try next?

Shawls to Mobius

Mobius Purple Wool

If your tired of shawls falling off your shoulders an alternative is to make a Möbius Shawl. The trick is to twist the shawl once than stitch one end to the side of the other end. This really is just a fancy poncho, with softer draping of fabric in the front. The technique works well for lighter weight shawls also.

These and many of my other weavings will be available at the Contemporary Handweavers of Houston Sale. The sale is in a new location this year. I’ll be working several of the days so drop by I’d love to see you.Guild Sale 2014