Category Archives: 4 harness weave

Colors That Pop

 

Chennille scarf

This painted skein of yarn intrigued me when shopping at HGA Convergence vendor hall in 2014. There was only one skein with this color scheme, yet it would be enough for warp for one scarf with some to spare.

Once  I got the painted warp on the loom and tried to cross it in the weft with different colors, green, bright blue, gold, each color just seemed to create mud. Then I remembered the cone of black chenille in my stash from years ago. A perfect solution. The warp colors now popped. The chenille gave a softness to the scarf that would be warmer in the cool months than if Tencel was used in the weft.

Weft color choices will enhance the warp 🙂 or leave you wondering what was I thinking 😦

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Spring weaving

Hooks and EyesI’m weaving scarves. With spring in the air , one day hot, one day cold, they will need to be light weight. A 10/2 tencel warp with a 20/2 silk pattern weft and a 30/2 silk tabby weft fills the bill. This is a miniature overshot pattern. ” Hooks and Eyes” (design 71)”, is  found in the book: Weaving Designs by Bertha Gray Hayes. These miniature overshot drafts work nicely in smaller formats like scarves.

Neil Diamond Tea Rose

Planted two new roses this year to replace some that had died. This is a Neil Diamond Tea Rose. Smells wonderful too. Now to continue weaving.

 

 

Sampling crimp weave

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Crimp weave sample

Sampling is something I rarely do, but since some warp remained on the loom, after weaving the last two scarves it was a perfect opportunity to play. The question that needed to be answered was the metallic yarn used as the tabby or tie down threads in the scarf below from the previous post, heat sensitive.

Southwest Glint

The metallic yarn or  thread was bought at the Houston International Quilt Festival two years ago. It was from the Marathon company and made in Korea. Other than saying it was a Metallic covered yarn, fiber content was not stated. The the core thread could be cotton, polyester, nylon or ? The sample was woven with patterned pull threads inserted to make crimp cloth. The fabric is steamed after pulling and tying the “pattern pull threads”.  Next the pull threads are removed. The experiment worked. I was pleased to learn that the mettallic yarn  had a heat treatable core, most likely polyester.

Now to weave a crimp weave scarf.

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Playing with Crackle

Southwest GlintOn the loom is a 4 harness crackle weave scarf. Crackle weave is a tied weave, where a tabby shot follows a pattern shot. For the tabby I’m using a metallic covered thread to add some sparkle. The picture doesn’t show the sparkle well.

Ideas from the book “A Crackle Weave Companion” by Lucy M. Brusic was used to help create this design. She shows how to use traditional crackle threading, with treadling from a different crackle pattern to create a new design. With Fiberworks I combined a threading from ” A Handweavers Pattern Book” by Marguerite Davison and used a threading from another crackle pattern in that book. When designing with Fiberworks I often don’t view the pattern with the tabby inserted, which are the tie-down threads. This lets me look at the over-all design better. When I weave the tabby would be added. To give a sturdier cloth.

Southwest

The first scarf woven on this warp is above. As I was weaving this scarf  my mind was having a Senior moment, so the tabby was not added after the pattern threads. Half way through weaving it struck me that crackle weave is done with a tabby thread woven after each pattern thread. Oh my, lucky for me the floats were not long.  So on this warp two distinctly different scarves were woven.

The Tale of 2 Scarves

imageI find it hard to weave two things alike. My  brain wants change. Boredom sets in, and distractions keep me from the loom. So something gets changed up. It’s usually not worth putting a warp on that only makes one finished item so I change the treadling, tie up, or weft yarns used.

The scarf above was woven with a solid 10/2 bamboo warp. This was actually the second scarf I wove on this warp threaded for a canvas weave. If you read my last blog post Canvas Weave Towels, these scarves use the same weave structure. I did not tie onto the towel warp. Being a narrow warp it was easy to start from scratch. The scarf uses a variegated hand painted, 10/2 Tencel from Just Our Yarn. I love their yarns, just wish you could buy them direct and not only at shows. So I added to my stash with several skeins of their yarns that I purchased at Convergence 2014.

Canvas Weave Scarf bambooThe first scarf woven on this warp I found boring, being a solid color. It uses 10/2 bamboo from Webs that they no longer carry. This yarn is used  in both the warp and weft. A weaving friend, described it as a manly scarf.  So maybe it will have some surface design added in the future to liven it up.

Next I’ll move on to other weave structures, leaving canvas weave behind.

With all the flowers and baby ducks my morning walks have been quite enjoyable.

Canvas weave towels

imageThe weaving study group I belong to chose linen as their topic for the year. Individuals were to weave samples  with at least 50% linen. Linen needs to be used in the warp or weft, with no fibers blended with the linen. I have linen in my stash but do not weave with it very often. This is due to how linen gets a bad rap for being difficult to manage in the warp. Linen is also an expensive fiber.

The weave structure used in these towels was a 4 harness canvas weave. The weave structure was simple to weave. By inserting plain weave after weaving four repeats of the canvas weave, open work squares were created. If one just repeated the canvas weave throughout, the fabric has stripes.

Canvas weave stripesTo add interest embroidery was added to every other stripe. The blue showing through the center in the photo is from the fabric below which is embroidered.

The towels have a beautiful hand and appearance that only linen can give. Look for additional linen weavings in the future.

Spring rose

Finishing Projects

Handwoven Shibori yardage

Handwoven Shibori yardage

The Handwoven Shibori yardage has been pressed and is ready to be made into something wearable it has a nice drape being 8/2 Tencel. The dye penetration is not as even as I would have liked, but it does create an interesting horizontal pattern.

Honeycomb runner

Honeycomb runner

The honeycomb runner made with linen and jute to outline the cells looks lovely on the table. The jute transitions from purple, blue, light green, yellow, orange, hot pink,  then reverse back to purple.  The back has long floats. For handbags or clothing this fabric will require lining. I have some novelty silk from Habu, I would like to use in the future with this weave structure.

Honey comb  runner back

Honey comb runner back

Honeycomb for Spring

Honeycomb Weave

HoneyComb Weave

Next on the loom is a Honeycomb weave. It’s funny in to have chosen this, since it is also know as an undulating weft effect and my previous post was on an undulating twill. The inspiration for this project came from shopping for a  bargain at the local “Big Lots” store. Here I found in the craft aisle jute cord meant for kids jewelry.jutecordThe rainbow colors struck my eyes as the perfect color combination to be used for a runner. The jute is used in the weft for creating the outline for the cells. The warp and weft yarn for the interior of the cells uses a single ply linen.

In the Shuttle Craft Monograph #9 – Undulating Weft Effects by Harriet Tidball, she states that the warp should be fairly fine and elastic, while the weft should be the same as warp or finer. The weft outline should be thicker and soft and elastic. Linen should not be used for outline weft due to it’s stiffness. A soft cotton yarn would be a good choice for outline weft. My yarn choices could be considered to be poor choices. The Jute yarn required some hand manipulation for the cell outline and the linen yarn in the warp and weft is anything but elastic. I experimented with the number of linen wefts in each cell and settled on 8. The finished weight is wonderful for a table runner. I need to do the finishing and then will share a picture of the finished project.