Tales From HGA Convergence 2016

 

imageI’m back  from attending HGA Convergence 2016 in Milwaukee, Wi. If you have never attended, it is an experience I highly recommend. From the exhibits, speakers and classes to the vendor hall, so much inspiration. Being able to talk with weavers from all over the nation and world in one place is invaluable. HGA Convergence includes other fiber arts beyond hand weaving: felting, dyeing, spinning and others.

Yarn Purchased at Convergence

The vendor hall had all kinds of equipment, yarn, fiber, books and clothing. This was some of the yarn I purchased from Giovannia Imperia, Interlacements, Lone Star Loom Room, Redfish, Webs and Yarnbarn of Kansas. There were tools big and small. I tried weaving on 6 different looms including three different compu-dobby looms. This is invaluable if possibly buying a new loom in the future.

Tools purchased at Convergence 2016

The shuttle is a Flying Dutchman made by Louet.  It has 2 unique features. A bar that will lift any warp yarns that are lower in the shed, and a guide for the yarn coming off the shuttle. I had never seen one before and actually tried weaving with one in the vendor hall and knew I had to have one. Next, there are two weaving swords the top darker one made by Kessnich Looms and the other by Schacht. The small shuttle I’ll use with my Inckle loom and tablet weaving. It has one edge that is sharp to help beat in the yarn. It also was made by Kessnich looms.

I took 4 classes learning new techniques in all.

Go Big with Color and Weave   Karen Donde

When a Single Harness is not Enough – Double Harness                                         Techniques.   Sara Von Tresckow

An Introduction to Natural Dying and Woven Shibori.   Catharine Ellis

Rep Weave – Books,Bags, Boxes, and Beyond.  Lucienne Coifman

The trick now is to apply some of what I learned.

Colors That Pop

 

Chennille scarf

This painted skein of yarn intrigued me when shopping at HGA Convergence vendor hall in 2014. There was only one skein with this color scheme, yet it would be enough for warp for one scarf with some to spare.

Once  I got the painted warp on the loom and tried to cross it in the weft with different colors, green, bright blue, gold, each color just seemed to create mud. Then I remembered the cone of black chenille in my stash from years ago. A perfect solution. The warp colors now popped. The chenille gave a softness to the scarf that would be warmer in the cool months than if Tencel was used in the weft.

Weft color choices will enhance the warp:) or leave you wondering what was I thinking😦

Spicing up Huck Lace

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Varigated warp, Solid weft

Huck Lace is traditionally  done the same solid color in both the warp and weft. The floats that create the design, are more visible with a solid color scarf. But why always follow tradition in your weaving, explore! So that is exactly what I have done with these two scarves. The weave structure is the same Huck lace pattern used in the previous post Love that huck.

The first scarf used a Varigated 8/2 Tencel warp. The weft was a solid color to coordinate with the darker color in the warp. The second scarf used a metallic quilting thread as the weft. Here the same warp was used as in the first scarf. The metallic  weft created texture in the scarf after washing.

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Varigated Tencel warp. Metallic quilting thread weft.

 

Love that huck

Light Purple Huck laceI’ve been busy weaving Huck lace scarves. It is one of my favorite weave structures. The first were these lovely purple tencel ones. I modified the draft from one for 12 harnesses to weave on 8 harnesses. But it still creates a nice pattern.Silver grey huck scarf

Being happy with the first 2 scarves, I tied on a new warp. These used a silver-gray tencel for the warp and weft. Later I played with the extra warp making samples for possible later projects. Using different types of yarn for the weft, as well as a different weave structures to create a crimp weave samples too.

When  the metallic quilting thread was used for top of sample in photo 1, it remained soft after washing. This same metallic thread was used in the second sample photo. The crimp process gave a rough hand which would not work for a scarf. The third photo an 8/2 poly was used in weft giving a much nicer hand for this crimp weave sample.

If you’ve read this far I hope you enjoy the sunset at the beach in Cancun, Mexico, taken on a recent vacation.April 2016 557

Spring weaving

Hooks and EyesI’m weaving scarves. With spring in the air , one day hot, one day cold, they will need to be light weight. A 10/2 tencel warp with a 20/2 silk pattern weft and a 30/2 silk tabby weft fills the bill. This is a miniature overshot pattern. ” Hooks and Eyes” (design 71)”, is  found in the book: Weaving Designs by Bertha Gray Hayes. These miniature overshot drafts work nicely in smaller formats like scarves.

Neil Diamond Tea Rose

Planted two new roses this year to replace some that had died. This is a Neil Diamond Tea Rose. Smells wonderful too. Now to continue weaving.

 

 

To fold or not to fold

6 harness twill

The first towels of the year. These cotton towels let me play a little with color. Two shades of blue, a soft green and natural colored yarns were used. When the towels are opened:

Plaid twill towel

Large horizontal border stripes are visible. How do you fold towels? Do you fold in half or fold with each side behind the towel and the towel center on view. Does it matter if your pattern is symmetrical or asymmetrical? What if there are warp color or pattern that will only show when the towel is folded in half or not at all.

Grand Rapids, MN

No this is not Texas in March. While visiting my Mother last week in Minnesota we went to see my sister in northern Minnesota. There was snow. Snow to walk through and snow to make into snowballs and throw. Back in Texas it’s warmer and a coat isn’t required.

Same Warp Different Designs

Rep FlowersOk, I’ve been offline for a long time. Life got in the way. Some good and some bad , but  I’m going to try to get back in the groove of posting more often. These Rep weave pieces were woven with the warp from Rosalie Nielson’s workshop last October.( I don’t yet have another warp on that loom.) They were all done using the same tie-up. The different looks were created using treadling variations and weft differences. The first is a traditional rep weave, an original design. Applying the  design tools learned in Rosalie’s workshop made creating an original design a breeze.Cell Rep

This runner  does not have the thin weft in between each thick weft. It gives a totally different look. The weft is also half the thickness as the traditional rep runner. Below is a close up of a sample piece with this technique.

Rep close up

I’ll close with these Spring flowers from a recent trip to the Dallas Arboretum.

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Simple things

Rag coasters

Weaving simple works when one can’t weave on your floor loom. These rag weave coasters were woven on a 2 harness peacock table loom. They will be gifted to a neighbor whose dog ate their last coasters.

Rep-weave

I’ve started to weave on the remaining warp from the Rosalie Neilson workshop I took in October. I’ve designed a new runner with what I learned in the workshop. When the rep weave runner is off the loom and hemmed I’ll share the final results. The runner is woven but there is still another yard of warp I want to weave. With any luck the weaving will be completed yet this week.
2015 Red Amaryllis

This red Amaryllis bought in the after Christmas sales is now blooming, brightening up this gray overcast day.

Change the Color

Jewel on the loomSo I skipped threading the heddles and sleying the reed, by tying on a new warp to the last warp on the loom. From earthy Autumn to Jewel tones the warp has changed. These colors just made me feel happy as I wove. There will be 5 Cottolin (cotton and linen blend yarn) towels.

Jewel False Satin Towels

One of the towels will be for me and the remaining four are for sale in the Gallery at the Contemporary Handweavers of Houston, Guild House . The color in the photo on the loom is better than of the finished towels. Funny how different light sources affect the captured image.

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This Santa ornament was added to our Christmas tree this year. It was made from a Mill Hill beaded counted cross stitch kit. The kits contain everything one needs to complete the project. The beads add sparkle to the piece. I’ve started stitching a new ornament for next year.  The tree is decorated for Christmas and awaiting packages to be placed beneath.

Autumn Rep Runner

imageThe completed Autumn inspired runner  is from the Rosalie Neilson weaving workshop I took last month.  The runner will be gracing my dining room table at Thanksgiving. Of course once all the food is placed on the table it maybe hard to see.  There will be the traditional turkey with all the extras, green bean casserole, candied sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes and gravy, asparagus, cranberry sauce, and yeast rolls, followed up by pumpkin pie. We’ll be hosting my daughter and her boy friend. My son and his fiancé will be at her families dinner.

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The remaining two motifs woven were published in the previous post, “Designing with Rep Weave.”

Little oranges

The bounty from our little orange tree. The top of the tree suffers from freezing last winter. Yet it produced 10 oranges much better than last years crop of zero. May you all enjoy the bounty and fellowship of Thanksgiving.