Tag Archives: advancing twill

Obstacles

It is difficult to weave these days, that left footprint is much too large for the treadles on the loom. Achilles tendinitis is the main diagnosis. I’m not sure how long I’ll have the boot as an appendage. Weaving isn’t the only activity it has impacted, no more daily walks in the park.

This shawl was woven right before being booted. It has lots of fringe to twist. That’s a good activity to pursue. Then there’s the shawl woven on the same warp with a different color weft with fringe to twist. The weft for the shawl below is “whippel blue”. The shawl above has an “iris” weft. Twisting all that fringe should help keep me out of trouble.

Slow weaving is progressing on a secret project for my guilds annual swatch swap. I’ve found that the 8 treadles are all within reach of my good leg by turning slightly on the bench. Not the most ergonomic process. I don’t want to be labeled a “thrum bag”, so a little weaving will be done over the next days. I’ll write about what I’m weaving after the exchange.

Do your injuries prevent your pursuing your craft or do you find ways to work around them?

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Weaving away winter blahs

The weather has been cold and dreary. The lack of sunshine makes photography very difficult. The above shawl is a 12 shaft advancing twill, woven with 8/2 Tencel. Two colors in the warp and 1 in the weft. I love the movement the pattern creates. After I wove it though I couldn’t decide what side I liked better.

So what do you like better, the brighter side or the side where the purple weft stands out?

The fringe felt like I would never finish twisting; 6 ends per group, 236 groups per shawl. Thank goodness for fringe twisters.

We took a trip to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. A nice break from the dreary weather. Walking the beach is something I have always loved doing. Very few seashells and those to be had were small. Couldn’t go in the Pacific Ocean here, Riptides. Galveston, is one of the closest beaches to where we live but the water is muddy, not as beautiful as the above beach on the pacific coast.

The trip included shopping and the purchase of this piece. I was attracted to the design and colors. Probably won’t use as a table runner as I assumed it was meant. Instead, it maybe cut up for bright pillows.

Back home I’m wearing sweaters and waiting for spring to plant flowers.

A sunset dinner sailing cruise was a memorable time.

What I’ve been upto

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Hurricane Harvey and it’s aftermath have caused a slow down or halt to any weaving the past 2 weeks. I’m lucky our house was not flooded. We were in a mandatory evacuation zone. After attempting to get out of town but finding roads blocked by rising waters. (A very scary situation) the  night was spent in a hotel parking lot. The next day we were able to drive to a hotel in another area. This was our home the next 5 days. Before leaving our home we tried to move what furniture we could to the 2nd floor. Furniture too heavy or big, stayed down. Two of the looms were on the first level. One was placed on top of the dining room table that was on blocks, and the second on wood blocks.

The above scarves were completed before all this drama. It is my first attempt at Echo and Iris.

 

It’s hard to believe there are 2 colors of 20/2 mercerized cotton in the warp that alternate. And 2 different colors in the warp that alternate. The color blending that occurs creates totally different colors. The different colors in each scarf are from changing the weft colors used.

So yesterday I spent some time weaving. I’m amazed at how calming I found that time. My thoughts and prays are with those who have suffered from the storm.

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Crimp Weave workshop

Crimp bamboo poly sewing

Crimp weave sample

In January I attended Dianne Totten‘s Crimp  Weave Workshop put on by the Contemporary Handweaver’s of Houston  Guild.

My loom was setup to do weft Shibori which meant I needed to use a polyester or Orlon yarn in the weft to create crimp cloth. These two types of yarn are heat sensitive. The warp could be any fiber I wanted to use.  I used a teal 10/2 bamboo with a few stripes of silver 8/2 Tencel. The threading was an advancing twill.  As a workshop the point is to try to weave as many samples as possible. After the samples are woven and taken off the loom,the pattern threads are pulled tightly up. Next the piece is steamed, and pattern threads are removed. The result is crimp cloth, fabric with permanent texture.

Sample on loom.  Black threads are pattern pull threads.

Sample on loom.
Black threads are pattern pull threads.

Samples above were made during workshop. Different yarn types, sizes and combinations of yarns were used in weft to create the samples. The possibilities are endless.  Now what weave structure to try next?