Category Archives: Linen

Linen and Huck

 

img_0820Linen and Huck lace weave go beautifully together. The loom was threaded with a bleached 16/2 linen  in an 8 shaft Huck lace pattern. These two towels and the following gray towel were woven on this warp.

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The guild annual sale has come and gone. An amazing amount of work goes into putting on this event. It always amazes me how many towels we sell.

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Cotton, linen, and cottolin towels of every weave structure. Inspiration for future projects the sale is full of. Since I weave more than I can use or gift, this is an event I participate in to support my guild. Hopefully it will continue to take place in future years or I will need to find a different outlet for my work.

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Possibly a swallowtail, it’s definitely larger than the monarchs that visit. Not sure if he was resting, injured or drying his wings.

Canvas weave towels

imageThe weaving study group I belong to chose linen as their topic for the year. Individuals were to weave samples  with at least 50% linen. Linen needs to be used in the warp or weft, with no fibers blended with the linen. I have linen in my stash but do not weave with it very often. This is due to how linen gets a bad rap for being difficult to manage in the warp. Linen is also an expensive fiber.

The weave structure used in these towels was a 4 harness canvas weave. The weave structure was simple to weave. By inserting plain weave after weaving four repeats of the canvas weave, open work squares were created. If one just repeated the canvas weave throughout, the fabric has stripes.

Canvas weave stripesTo add interest embroidery was added to every other stripe. The blue showing through the center in the photo is from the fabric below which is embroidered.

The towels have a beautiful hand and appearance that only linen can give. Look for additional linen weavings in the future.

Spring rose

Honeycomb for Spring

Honeycomb Weave

HoneyComb Weave

Next on the loom is a Honeycomb weave. It’s funny in to have chosen this, since it is also know as an undulating weft effect and my previous post was on an undulating twill. The inspiration for this project came from shopping for a  bargain at the local “Big Lots” store. Here I found in the craft aisle jute cord meant for kids jewelry.jutecordThe rainbow colors struck my eyes as the perfect color combination to be used for a runner. The jute is used in the weft for creating the outline for the cells. The warp and weft yarn for the interior of the cells uses a single ply linen.

In the Shuttle Craft Monograph #9 – Undulating Weft Effects by Harriet Tidball, she states that the warp should be fairly fine and elastic, while the weft should be the same as warp or finer. The weft outline should be thicker and soft and elastic. Linen should not be used for outline weft due to it’s stiffness. A soft cotton yarn would be a good choice for outline weft. My yarn choices could be considered to be poor choices. The Jute yarn required some hand manipulation for the cell outline and the linen yarn in the warp and weft is anything but elastic. I experimented with the number of linen wefts in each cell and settled on 8. The finished weight is wonderful for a table runner. I need to do the finishing and then will share a picture of the finished project.

To Mangle or Not

Mangle

Mangle

A Mangle is a tool that adds beauty to finished Linen items.
Linen that has been mangled is imparted with a sheen that is hard to attain by other methods. In modern society it might be viewed as an item of torture. Non electrified, this mangle requires manual labor, it goes against our modern society. One of the members of the Contemporary Handweavers of Houston has loaned this mangle to the Guild membership to use. The mangle was acquired in Sweden needing some tender loving care, which Julie’s  husband provided. Having never used a mangle. I was eager to see the difference that it would make to the appearance of a linen textile. Tracy demonstrated the use of the mangle for our WOW study group. She misted with water the piece to be mangled and ran it several times through the mangle rollers between an upper and lower layer of sheeting fabric.  This look can not be attained by ironing alone. It is best done after washing the linen  item for the first time and air drying ( no machine drying), till slightly damp.  I definitely will attempt to mangle any future linen items I weave.