Tag Archives: Crimp weave

Love that huck

Light Purple Huck laceI’ve been busy weaving Huck lace scarves. It is one of my favorite weave structures. The first were these lovely purple tencel ones. I modified the draft from one for 12 harnesses to weave on 8 harnesses. But it still creates a nice pattern.Silver grey huck scarf

Being happy with the first 2 scarves, I tied on a new warp. These used a silver-gray tencel for the warp and weft. Later I played with the extra warp making samples for possible later projects. Using different types of yarn for the weft, as well as a different weave structures to create a crimp weave samples too.

When  the metallic quilting thread was used for top of sample in photo 1, it remained soft after washing. This same metallic thread was used in the second sample photo. The crimp process gave a rough hand which would not work for a scarf. The third photo an 8/2 poly was used in weft giving a much nicer hand for this crimp weave sample.

If you’ve read this far I hope you enjoy the sunset at the beach in Cancun, Mexico, taken on a recent vacation.April 2016 557

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Sampling crimp weave

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Crimp weave sample

Sampling is something I rarely do, but since some warp remained on the loom, after weaving the last two scarves it was a perfect opportunity to play. The question that needed to be answered was the metallic yarn used as the tabby or tie down threads in the scarf below from the previous post, heat sensitive.

Southwest Glint

The metallic yarn or  thread was bought at the Houston International Quilt Festival two years ago. It was from the Marathon company and made in Korea. Other than saying it was a Metallic covered yarn, fiber content was not stated. The the core thread could be cotton, polyester, nylon or ? The sample was woven with patterned pull threads inserted to make crimp cloth. The fabric is steamed after pulling and tying the “pattern pull threads”.  Next the pull threads are removed. The experiment worked. I was pleased to learn that the mettallic yarn  had a heat treatable core, most likely polyester.

Now to weave a crimp weave scarf.

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Playing with crimp weave

Crimp weave 10/2 & sewing

This sample of crimp weave was woven on warp left after weaving a scarf. It’s narrow since the original scarf was only 7 inches wide. The warp is a 10/2 Tencel and weft a polyester sewing thread. This gives a lovely hand. Note to self when setting up to weave future scarf warp width should be at least 15 inches in reed.

Floating squares towel
The towels which were on the loom are off and need to be hemmed. This was the warp I showed in a previous post “Spring Has Sprung“.  I’ll post the variety of designs I wove when the handwork is finished. My time lately has been spent sewing handwoven fabric into a garment for the upcoming Contemporary Handweavers of Texas conference in June. With a sigh of relief it will go to the post office tomorrow. There will be pictures to share after the conference. So what to put on the loom next?
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We had a little too much rain a week ago. The lake flooded in the park where I walk. Later that day the water had receded and the grounds cleaned up. Other areas near continue to have flooding a week later. More rain is in the forecast here. With any luck it will come in light sprinkles. Today was a beautiful sunny day, letting us relax with a swim in the pool.

Crimp Weave workshop

Crimp bamboo poly sewing

Crimp weave sample

In January I attended Dianne Totten‘s Crimp  Weave Workshop put on by the Contemporary Handweaver’s of Houston  Guild.

My loom was setup to do weft Shibori which meant I needed to use a polyester or Orlon yarn in the weft to create crimp cloth. These two types of yarn are heat sensitive. The warp could be any fiber I wanted to use.  I used a teal 10/2 bamboo with a few stripes of silver 8/2 Tencel. The threading was an advancing twill.  As a workshop the point is to try to weave as many samples as possible. After the samples are woven and taken off the loom,the pattern threads are pulled tightly up. Next the piece is steamed, and pattern threads are removed. The result is crimp cloth, fabric with permanent texture.

Sample on loom.  Black threads are pattern pull threads.

Sample on loom.
Black threads are pattern pull threads.

Samples above were made during workshop. Different yarn types, sizes and combinations of yarns were used in weft to create the samples. The possibilities are endless.  Now what weave structure to try next?