Tag Archives: Textiles

Crackle weave sampler

Crackle weave was one of the structures my weaving study group choose to investigate this year. Two  recently published books on Crackle weave, gave new interest to this old weave structure. In one of these books, A Crackle Weave Companion by Lucy M. Brusic, there is an example of a sampler to use in exploring crackle weave. Since I do not own this book I went to one of my own weaving books.

Crackle Weave is discussed on pages 130-135.

Crackle Weave is discussed on pages 130-135.

The Handweaver’s Pattern Directory, by Anne Dixon, shows many examples of 4 harness crackle weave. The section on crackle weave is on pages 130-135. Using these weave designs I created a sampler. Four different crackle patterns across, with each pattern repeated multiple times to better show the design.  Each of the 4 pattern blocks has a different warp color. There were 12 different treadlings used, with the weft color changed for each treadling. Each treadling is repeated  at least 2 times. The sampler has 36 different designs. 21 of these designs are found in The Handweaver’s Pattern Directory. Samplers are a good way to see a variety of designs from a family of similar type weaves. An added bonus was trying different color combinations and size of weft yarns.

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Handwoven Shibori on the Loom

This is Handwoven Shibori being woven on a floor loom. The weaving is fairly easy, plain weave with a pattern thread every 6 ends. The pattern threads form a fancy twill pattern. I don’t use nylon fish line for my pattern threads which will later be pulled gathering the fabric. I use a 3/2 mercerized cotton yarn that is quite strong. Nylon fish line will not break when pulled. The 3/2 could still break while pulling if  pulled too hard. If a thread breaks while pulling it will cause a horizontal band to be dyed in  the fabric. This happens since the fabric will not be gathered equally in this area. The tighter the pattern thread is pulled the crisper the dyed design will be. The 3/2 yarn

Handwoven Shibori on the Loom

Handwoven Shibori on the Loom

is much easier to handle and knot after  gathering  the fabric for dyeing. When I weave this fabric I try to think about what colors I will choose to dye with. The fabric will be used for a garment when completed.

Summer and Winter Complete!

Summer and Winter Towel

Summer and Winter Towel

My larger loom sits in my livingroom where visitors and everyone in the house pass by it often. I have had a Summer and Winter piece designed for a study group project on it for nearly 2 years. The design was inspired by the backsplash tiles in our remodeled kitchen. After weaving off samples and 2 towels, I tweeked my lower back. Alas, I could not get myself to go back to the loom to complete the last towel which was half done. The piece wasn’t a dog but a nice art piece on the loom. I needed the loom for a larger piece that could not be woven on my Baby Mac loom. I’m proud to say the towel was completed and a new work is in the process of being threaded.

Rustic Handwoven Shibori

Close-up of a Handwoven Shibori Scarf, using bleach technique.

Close-up of a Handwoven Shibori Scarf, using bleach technique.

Bleached Shibori Sample with pattern threads removed.

Bleached Shibori Sample with pattern threads removed.

Pattern threads pulled creating resist for bleaching process.

Pattern threads pulled creating resist for bleaching process.

I love to experiment, probably has something to do with working in chemical labs early in my career. My newest adventure uses black rayon in both the warp and weft of a Handwoven Shibori piece. Instead of applying dyes to the piece after pulling the pattern threads, I bleached the fabric. It’s important to dilute the bleach so as not to damage the fibers. Also after rinsing the bleached fabric needs to be soaked in a dechlorinator such as hydrogen peroxide found in your local drugstore. A finished scarf called “Rustic” can be seen in the “Handwoven Shibori Gallery”