Tag Archives: Handwoven Shibori

Busy Summer Days

This stool was started in a workshop at the Contemporary Handweavers of Texas conference in June. I don’t always finish theseprojects that are started in workshops and this one was not even half done when our class time was over. So I am so proud of myself for completing this loom stool. It is 12 inches high. Can’t forget to show the bottom side of this stool, too.

The Huck Lace scarves on the loom last post were woven off. I enjoyed weaving them so much I tied on a second warp and wove another 2 scarves this time in dark teal. All these scarves were finished with twisted fringe and beads.

Indoors, I wasn’t getting true colors when photographing so I took the above scarves outdoors on a sunny ☀️ day. By setting up in the shade of our trees to avoid shadows. I finally got a decent photo of the shawl that won 2nd place in the members exhibit at CHT. This was really a difficult piece to photograph.

One of the study groups I belong to, Westside Weavers, had an indigo dye day this week at Penny’s house in the country. Some of the pieces below are drying on the line.

Watch the indigo change as it oxidizes. When removed from the dye bath the pieces are a teal green and then change before ones eyes to blue. MAGIC!

I hurriedly wove a handwoven shibori scarf last week to dye. The scarf is plain weave with the pattern pull strings woven in a twill pattern every 6 picks. In the past I’ve always dyed my handwoven shibori scarves with procion dyes that were painted on. I’ve always wanted to try dyeing one by dipping in an indigo bath. The finished results can be seen below. yes I will finish twisting the fringe but I wanted to share.

Summer isn’t over yet so there is still time to find some inspiration.

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Natural Dyeing and Handwoven Shibori

by Catherine Ellis

by Catherine Ellis

Catharine Ellis wrote the book,  “Woven  Shibori”. While attending HGA Convergence 2016, I had the privilege of taking a class with her,  Natural Dyeing and Hand Woven Shibori. This was not a hands on class, but a lecture with a wealth of information she generously shared with us.

If you’ve followed my blog there have been several posts on Handwoven Shibori pieces I’ve created.  All my work has used synthetic dyes, At one time Catharine also used synthetic dyes, but today she only works with Natural dyes. The variety of colors She achieves with her techniques is amazing.

My future to do list now includes more Woven Shibori dyed with natural dyes.

 

Tranquil Waters Dress

Tranquil Waters DressAlmost 2 years ago I wove and dyed 3 some yards of Handwoven Shibori fabric. The dyed fabric reminded me of the tranquil waters in the Bahamas. I wanted to make something to wear, but what? In my mind I envisioned a dress, but there wasn’t enough fabric. The Shibori fabric would need to be the focal point in the dress. So I wove another 3 yards of solid color fabric in a simple 8 harness twill, using a cotton/silk blend. The Shibori fabric is made from 8/2 Tencel.  These two fabrics were used to sew the dress using Simplicity 1586 pattern.  I  modeled the dress in the Contemporary Handweavers of Texas 2015 conference fashion show this past weekend. The back of the dress also has the center panel of handwoven Shibori fabric with side panels in the twill fabric. It only took 2 years but I accomplished my goal. The challenge now is to find a use for the remaining fabric.  What do you envision creating?

 

Crimp Weave workshop

Crimp bamboo poly sewing

Crimp weave sample

In January I attended Dianne Totten‘s Crimp  Weave Workshop put on by the Contemporary Handweaver’s of Houston  Guild.

My loom was setup to do weft Shibori which meant I needed to use a polyester or Orlon yarn in the weft to create crimp cloth. These two types of yarn are heat sensitive. The warp could be any fiber I wanted to use.  I used a teal 10/2 bamboo with a few stripes of silver 8/2 Tencel. The threading was an advancing twill.  As a workshop the point is to try to weave as many samples as possible. After the samples are woven and taken off the loom,the pattern threads are pulled tightly up. Next the piece is steamed, and pattern threads are removed. The result is crimp cloth, fabric with permanent texture.

Sample on loom.  Black threads are pattern pull threads.

Sample on loom.
Black threads are pattern pull threads.

Samples above were made during workshop. Different yarn types, sizes and combinations of yarns were used in weft to create the samples. The possibilities are endless.  Now what weave structure to try next?

Dye day as the weather turns

image

Just finished dyeing one of the 2 Shibori- handwoven scarves woven earlier this year. Actually the dyeing took place last Tuesday as the temps were dropping, but no warmer days to do this in the near future. So the dyes were prepared In the garage. The scarves with the pattern warps pulled have Procion MX dyes painted onto each side. The scarf was then rolled up in plastic wrap. The temps outdoors had dropped below 70 degrees, so no curing to be done outside in the sun. The scarves were microwaved to steam the dye and left to sit inside until the following day to rinse out.  Procion MX dyes need temps above 70 degrees to set.

Boysenberry Handwoven Shibori

The completed Boysenberry Handwoven Shibori scarf. It reminds me of the petunias in my garden this summer.

Hand woven  Shibori scarf  Blues 2014

The second scarf was dyed with a Royal Blue and Green. The patterning has a wood grain effect.

 

More Shibori

Busy weaving handwoven Shibori scarves. This one, I took off the loom yesterday. The pattern threads I am pulling and knotting for dyeing. The next scarf is half woven using a different pattern.
imageWish my flowers still looked so nice. The heat has taken its toll.

Finishing Projects

Handwoven Shibori yardage

Handwoven Shibori yardage

The Handwoven Shibori yardage has been pressed and is ready to be made into something wearable it has a nice drape being 8/2 Tencel. The dye penetration is not as even as I would have liked, but it does create an interesting horizontal pattern.

Honeycomb runner

Honeycomb runner

The honeycomb runner made with linen and jute to outline the cells looks lovely on the table. The jute transitions from purple, blue, light green, yellow, orange, hot pink,  then reverse back to purple.  The back has long floats. For handbags or clothing this fabric will require lining. I have some novelty silk from Habu, I would like to use in the future with this weave structure.

Honey comb  runner back

Honey comb runner back

Handwoven Shibori Snake

Handwoven Shibori snakeThis project has been a long time in process (see earlier post: Handwoven Shibori on the Loom). I just finished creating the “snake.” It is 3 1/2 yards of plain weave fabric with pattern threads in a twill weave. The pattern threads which are pink have been pulled tightly. These threads were woven in after every 8 shots of plain weave weft. It took way too long to pull up these threads. The next step is to dye the piece. The dye will not be able to penetrate into the folds of fabric created when pulling the pattern threads. I’m hoping temperatures will cool off from the 90’s with high humidity that we’ve been having so I can dye this piece outdoors. The question is what colors should be used? One color dye will be applied to the front and a second to the back. For now this remains a piece in progress.