Category Archives: Handwoven Scarves

Colors That Pop

 

Chennille scarf

This painted skein of yarn intrigued me when shopping at HGA Convergence vendor hall in 2014. There was only one skein with this color scheme, yet it would be enough for warp for one scarf with some to spare.

Once  I got the painted warp on the loom and tried to cross it in the weft with different colors, green, bright blue, gold, each color just seemed to create mud. Then I remembered the cone of black chenille in my stash from years ago. A perfect solution. The warp colors now popped. The chenille gave a softness to the scarf that would be warmer in the cool months than if Tencel was used in the weft.

Weft color choices will enhance the warp 🙂 or leave you wondering what was I thinking 😦

Spicing up Huck Lace

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Varigated warp, Solid weft

Huck Lace is traditionally  done the same solid color in both the warp and weft. The floats that create the design, are more visible with a solid color scarf. But why always follow tradition in your weaving, explore! So that is exactly what I have done with these two scarves. The weave structure is the same Huck lace pattern used in the previous post Love that huck.

The first scarf used a Varigated 8/2 Tencel warp. The weft was a solid color to coordinate with the darker color in the warp. The second scarf used a metallic quilting thread as the weft. Here the same warp was used as in the first scarf. The metallic  weft created texture in the scarf after washing.

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Varigated Tencel warp. Metallic quilting thread weft.

 

Love that huck

Light Purple Huck laceI’ve been busy weaving Huck lace scarves. It is one of my favorite weave structures. The first were these lovely purple tencel ones. I modified the draft from one for 12 harnesses to weave on 8 harnesses. But it still creates a nice pattern.Silver grey huck scarf

Being happy with the first 2 scarves, I tied on a new warp. These used a silver-gray tencel for the warp and weft. Later I played with the extra warp making samples for possible later projects. Using different types of yarn for the weft, as well as a different weave structures to create a crimp weave samples too.

When  the metallic quilting thread was used for top of sample in photo 1, it remained soft after washing. This same metallic thread was used in the second sample photo. The crimp process gave a rough hand which would not work for a scarf. The third photo an 8/2 poly was used in weft giving a much nicer hand for this crimp weave sample.

If you’ve read this far I hope you enjoy the sunset at the beach in Cancun, Mexico, taken on a recent vacation.April 2016 557

Spring weaving

Hooks and EyesI’m weaving scarves. With spring in the air , one day hot, one day cold, they will need to be light weight. A 10/2 tencel warp with a 20/2 silk pattern weft and a 30/2 silk tabby weft fills the bill. This is a miniature overshot pattern. ” Hooks and Eyes” (design 71)”, is  found in the book: Weaving Designs by Bertha Gray Hayes. These miniature overshot drafts work nicely in smaller formats like scarves.

Neil Diamond Tea Rose

Planted two new roses this year to replace some that had died. This is a Neil Diamond Tea Rose. Smells wonderful too. Now to continue weaving.

 

 

Playing with Crackle

Southwest GlintOn the loom is a 4 harness crackle weave scarf. Crackle weave is a tied weave, where a tabby shot follows a pattern shot. For the tabby I’m using a metallic covered thread to add some sparkle. The picture doesn’t show the sparkle well.

Ideas from the book “A Crackle Weave Companion” by Lucy M. Brusic was used to help create this design. She shows how to use traditional crackle threading, with treadling from a different crackle pattern to create a new design. With Fiberworks I combined a threading from ” A Handweavers Pattern Book” by Marguerite Davison and used a threading from another crackle pattern in that book. When designing with Fiberworks I often don’t view the pattern with the tabby inserted, which are the tie-down threads. This lets me look at the over-all design better. When I weave the tabby would be added. To give a sturdier cloth.

Southwest

The first scarf woven on this warp is above. As I was weaving this scarf  my mind was having a Senior moment, so the tabby was not added after the pattern threads. Half way through weaving it struck me that crackle weave is done with a tabby thread woven after each pattern thread. Oh my, lucky for me the floats were not long.  So on this warp two distinctly different scarves were woven.

The Tale of 2 Scarves

imageI find it hard to weave two things alike. My  brain wants change. Boredom sets in, and distractions keep me from the loom. So something gets changed up. It’s usually not worth putting a warp on that only makes one finished item so I change the treadling, tie up, or weft yarns used.

The scarf above was woven with a solid 10/2 bamboo warp. This was actually the second scarf I wove on this warp threaded for a canvas weave. If you read my last blog post Canvas Weave Towels, these scarves use the same weave structure. I did not tie onto the towel warp. Being a narrow warp it was easy to start from scratch. The scarf uses a variegated hand painted, 10/2 Tencel from Just Our Yarn. I love their yarns, just wish you could buy them direct and not only at shows. So I added to my stash with several skeins of their yarns that I purchased at Convergence 2014.

Canvas Weave Scarf bambooThe first scarf woven on this warp I found boring, being a solid color. It uses 10/2 bamboo from Webs that they no longer carry. This yarn is used  in both the warp and weft. A weaving friend, described it as a manly scarf.  So maybe it will have some surface design added in the future to liven it up.

Next I’ll move on to other weave structures, leaving canvas weave behind.

With all the flowers and baby ducks my morning walks have been quite enjoyable.

Treadle Envy

Bateman Blend CCW

When looking through sample books from Cross Country Weavers, I found myself having  treadle envy. I’m sure your asking yourself what could she possibly be talking about. My loom has 8 harnesses and 10 treadles.  The sample that I found myself interested in weaving needed 7 harnesses ( no problem) . Alas, it used 11 treadles.  A couple of years earlier I had designed a piece needing more treadles than I possessed.  Here  Tim’s Treadle Reducer program comes to the rescue.  You enter in the shafts, and treadles in the original design, and the number of shafts and treadles on your loom.

TreadlereducerClick on ” Make a grid” , to go to next step below: Entry

Treadle Reducer Entry                            Treadle Reducer results

In reducing the number of treadles needed to weave the design, treadling becomes more involved. At times you need to depress two treadles at the same time. A small price to pay to weave more complex designs.

This program has allowed me to begin weaving a scarf inspired by a sample by Sally Orgren in Cross Country Weavers, March 2008, using  a  Bateman Blend  pattern. The photo at the top, shows what will become the backside of my scarf. So follow the blog to see the finished scarf in a future post.

Dye day as the weather turns

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Just finished dyeing one of the 2 Shibori- handwoven scarves woven earlier this year. Actually the dyeing took place last Tuesday as the temps were dropping, but no warmer days to do this in the near future. So the dyes were prepared In the garage. The scarves with the pattern warps pulled have Procion MX dyes painted onto each side. The scarf was then rolled up in plastic wrap. The temps outdoors had dropped below 70 degrees, so no curing to be done outside in the sun. The scarves were microwaved to steam the dye and left to sit inside until the following day to rinse out.  Procion MX dyes need temps above 70 degrees to set.

Boysenberry Handwoven Shibori

The completed Boysenberry Handwoven Shibori scarf. It reminds me of the petunias in my garden this summer.

Hand woven  Shibori scarf  Blues 2014

The second scarf was dyed with a Royal Blue and Green. The patterning has a wood grain effect.